A brutally honest review of the Royal Enfield Himalayan

Cisium

Finally made it
I'm reading this thread a few years after it was started and want to say I always interpreted Everide's "brutally honest" review as generally positive. He ticks all the "why it's not good enough" boxes that people who can afford seven bikes watch reviews to see ticked. But he also acknowledges that the Himalayan does everything competently, is cheap, and looks like an ant instead of a cockroach - which are the three reasons everyone who buys one buys one.
I mean let's face it: that's the best we can expect from any folks who make glossy videos about bikes they test for free.
 
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UnSupervised

Finally made it
Location
Cedar Rapids, IA
I'm reading this thread a few years after it was started and want to say I always interpreted Everide's "brutally honest" review as generally positive. He ticks all the "why it's not good enough" boxes that people who can afford seven bikes watch reviews to see ticked. But he also acknowledges that the Himalayan does everything competently, is cheap, and looks like an ant instead of a cockroach - which are the three reasons everyone who buys one buys one.
I mean let's face it: that's the best we can expect from any folks who makes glossy videos about bikes they test for free.
The Everide companion video is a Must Watch. It was the story of the near disaster in the making of the "Brutally Honest Review" video. It is long but, listen carefully to the comments made about the Himalayan in comparison to the KLR 650 being ridden on the same near disaster ride.
 

Jester

Well travelled
Location
Northants, UK
One thing that has been missed is that the Himsy isn't supposed to be seen outside of India! It's the only RE bike that isn't an RE [UK type] bike. It's designed to pootle around any sort of road lugging any sort of load and to be fixed with a hammer and bent twig in a monsoon. I have four bikes, a couple of Hondas, a CB500 and 900 Hornet and a Yamaha Tracer 9 as well as the Himsy. The 'best' one is the one for the job. I've off roaded on a CB500 [not intentional, or the current one, don't listen to drections from locals in Norfolk] and it plodded thorough, the 900 Hornet has gone over 1000 miles in well under 24 hours of motorway boredom for a charity ride and the Tracer and Himsy are too new [September 2022, 1400 miles on the RE and 1000 on the Yam] for me to have formed a valid opinion but so far the Himsy is more fun.

Isn't that what bikes are supposed to be?
 

Splinter

Well travelled
Location
Buenos Aires
When I saw the title of this thread I thought the review may have been the other Brutally Honest Review which in fact is a total hatchet job on the Himalayan, from the engine logo to the dash.
"Inadequate for North American roads..." is probably the most remarkable quote.
 

Bluestrom13

Well travelled
Location
Elswhere
Post #22 - (Quotes from).

" I'd rather be on the Himalayan right now, (than on the KLR)...... Then falls off....."Top heavy".

" They should call this thing the "Royal Tractor, 'cause it really does tractor up some real stuff." (At 8min 16sec).

" I'm really loving the Himalayan ".

Slightly more positive than the original post video, I'd say.
 

m1ckDELTA

Well travelled
I'm glad to see people are making up their own minds about the Himalayan and RE in general. It's currently the fastest growing motorbike company in the world so they're doing something right.


 

Jester

Well travelled
Location
Northants, UK
I watched the first 20 minutes or so, the hillclimb is interesting. He's doing it on a new bike, having run mine in the engine is a lot looser than new so he's probably losing some ponies there. Also he tries to ride in 3rd at under 3000 rpm up a 1:4 gradient? Hardly a fair test as peak torque is at about 4500.

If he thinks the Himsy saddle is uncomfortable he should try a Gladius!
 
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Jester

Well travelled
Location
Northants, UK
[Edit] I would sell it and get a Honda CB500X.
My advice is don't. I bought a new X in 2015 from Blade in Stratford Upon Avon and within a few days and a ride in the rain the frame was corroding around the swingarm pivot. Not only that the handlebars were slightly twisted and on 'fixing' that at the first service I was told that there might be a slightly weeping fork seal [after the 'fix'] and to keep an eye on it and let the dealer know if there was a problem. 20 miles later most of the fork oil was dripping off the single brake caliper and I was told that it would be six weeks before they could fix it. I mentioned the corrosion and they really didn't care.

After battling Blade I emailed Honda UK who also weren't interested, and in 9 months of ownership I had the bike on the road for 11 days and 1451 miles. In the end Blade had to strip the bike and have the frame resprayed [their version of events] or rattle canned it [what seems to have happened].

I had a look at the same area on other bikes of the same age and all had tool marks in the paint, I think that there was an issue on the assembly line [the CB500F, X and R were all identical apart from trim and in the case of the X suspension] that Honda didn't know about or address. Until my experience of the X I was a 'Honda Man' having owned six of which I still have three, but I would not buy another one newer than about 2008 when their quality went from excellent to based on the selling price.
 
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