Emergency Satellite Phones

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
This topic comes up every now and then, mostly becasue a person is going on a trip where the cell phone coverage may be sptty at best, or travelling alone.

I purchased a Delorme inReach Explorer, the precurser to the Garmin inReach Explorer - Garmin bought out Delorme. Good unit, bought for our trip to Dawson City from Victoria BC. Used it every night to let friends/family know we were alright. Had to use once becasue of no cell coverage, email(s) were sent.

Dusted it off the other day becasue we are planning our 2023 trip to Tuktoyaktuk. Looked at the plans and what would be the best to use. Fellows over on the ADVrider forum have been providing good insight into what is needed and what needs to be found out.

A bit of a preamble to my point, this unit is not just for tips/touring, but for your own backyard. There are qutie a few areas on Vancouver Island, on or off road riding where the cell phone coverage is spotty or non-existent. I don't mind this when riding on the asphaly, but when off the beaten track it can be discerning.

I'm retired and if I waited until a riding friend was available, wouldn't be riding much, so I do do a lot of riding on my own.

I started to realize that there is always a possibility that things can go south in a hurry. I'm relatively healthy, but this does not guarantee you will stay this way. A very, very brief lapse in concentration can result in an oops that can spoil even the most seasoned rider's day.

The inReach Explorer can be used as an email conduit to friends/family, and/or for more drastic events, SAR and medevac. The Garmin plans for the inReach Explorer provide for each event; however, the features available vary depending on your subscription.

There are other considerations such as what your medical plan covers, and what features your 3rd party health coverage has.

It's a rainy, miserable day here, my three motorcycles are in good nick, no work/maintenance to be done, so I get to contemplate the meaning of life - the number 42 comes to mind.

Cheers
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
I've been reflecting on the off the beaten track riding that I am now doing becasue of the Himalayan. I'm thinking I need a just in case bag that I can throw on the pillion seat. Haven't come to any decisions, but will be perusing the forums to get an idea of what I might want in this bag.

This is not regarding tools and such, these are good to, but items such as emergency blanket, water, matches, this type of survival gear.
 
Last edited:

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
I still remember the summer of 1954 - it lasted almost a week.
I was on a cycling tour of the Scottish Highlands, courtesy of the SYHA, and my dad on the front of the tandem.
I still and vivid memories of arriving at Hostels to find them looking like a casualty ward with the occupants suffering from what looked like first degree burns.
Some actually had to be removed by ambulance, others spoon fed and dressed by complete strangers.
And a bus had to be charted to get most members of the cycling club back home in time to start work!
 

Eatmore Mudd

Moderator
Staff member
I've been reflecting on the off the beaten track riding that I am now doing because of the Himalayan. I'm thinking I need a just in case bag that I can throw on the pillion seat. Haven't come to any decisions, but will be perusing the forums to get an idea of what I might want in this bag.

This is not regarding tools and such, these are good to, but items such as emergency blanket, water, matches, this type of survival gear.
The contents of my "go bag" change with the seasons to match them.
One item most folks overlook is a few days worth of basic meds/remedies/prescriptions.
 
Last edited:

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
Good catch on the meds. Going to the local hardware store to make a couple of pannier tubes to hold what I need.

Edit - very fortunate so far. Have no prescription/non-prescription meds to worry about. Don't use supplements either.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom