Himalayan — Outback Victoria, Australia afternoon ride.

Metalsnacks

Well travelled
Location
Sydney Australia
A quick afternoon tour of the northern section of Hattah-Kulkyne National Park to celebrate the Victorian public holiday. Rain quickly turns many of the tracks close to the Murray River into slime, most had dried out enough for trouble free riding, but there were many 4WD ruts to manoeuvre through.

Due to excessive rain towards the Aussie east coast, the Murray River is on the rise and close to the top of its banks. There’s a boat ramp under water there somewhere in the second picture.

Chalka Creek was a bone dry dust bowl when I sped through it 18 months ago. Now at a metre, the water level would be over the Himalayan’s tank!

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puttbutt

Well travelled
Location
NY
anytime that you're near any water source, are you always on the look out for crocs. or is it a paranoia that the media and entertainment business has created?
 

Metalsnacks

Well travelled
Location
Sydney Australia
anytime that you're near any water source, are you always on the look out for crocs. or is it a paranoia that the media and entertainment business has created?
It's definitely not media hype or paranoia. Croc attacks are a valid concern.

But we're talking Saltwater crocs and luckily their habitat is confined to the tropics, which is the far northern section of Australia, and I think if you look into it there are not really that many attacks -- less than half a dozen each year. Shark attacks are much more prevalent and occur Australia wide.
Since I'm about 3000km away from croc territory, I've got no concerns where I live. (y)

But I am always on the lookout for snakes, I've had quite a few encounters with Brown snakes and Red-belly black snakes.
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
Milk crate , HD cable ties, and , if required, a bungee zagged over the contents is basic Oz luggage.
Probably because most everything else eventually falls apart on our rough unsealed roads and tracks!
Actually allergic reaction to insect stings is our biggest killer, which is why most dress to suit.
 

petespace1

Well travelled
Location
NSW Aus
No disrespect Roy… mate I live in Oz and I know about milk crates on bikes. 😀 Thanks for your observations though. Sometimes simple mods can make a humble object a lot more functional, that’s what I was getting at. Let’s see if Metalsnacks replies ?
 
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Metalsnacks

Well travelled
Location
Sydney Australia
No disrespect Roy… mate I leave in Oz and I know about milk crates on bikes. 😀 Thanks for your observations though. Sometimes simple mods can make a humble object a lot more functional, that’s what I was getting at. Let’s see if Metalsnacks replies ?
Yep petespace1 it's a milk crate. I love 'em and this is the second iteration of milk crate mounting to the Himmy.
2-second description is that its directly bolted to a custom rack. Pics should tell the story. Bolts circled in pink.

Long winded description: keep reading...
Version 1
An old sun bleached Pauls Dairy crate that I "rescued" from my father-in-law's rural block. I just cable tied it to the stock rack of my 2020 Himmy with 6 cable ties and it was good for light duty work: groceries, my work lunch box and hard hat and whatever else would fit.
Occasionally one or two cable ties would snap (I spend half the year out near Mildura and travel a lot of dirt roads) I was always wary of the crate coming loose because stock rack doesn't offer much surface area for mounting, also there were reports of people breaking racks due to RE's stipulated 5kg load limit, so I never took it camping, but thought it had good potential if it was integrated properly. To remedy the situation I decided to buy the Hitchcocks rack. It was out of stock and I had a trip coming up, which gave me the perfect excuse to design my own rack and have a work colleague fab it up. The stock pannier frames were cut up and redesigned at the same time to mount straight and perfectly fit my Andy Strapz panniers.

Version 2 aim: To intergrate the milk crate as a sturdy optional piece of my overall luggage system.
Start with brand new milk crate
Crate is solidly mounted with 3 bolts. Rack frame has threaded inserts for these bolts.
Rack surface area nearly identical to the milk crate base.
Crate to act as skeleton for further luggage mounting.

Pictures:
New rear rack. Better design for milk crate.
mounting_0002_Bolts.jpg

New size versus old size.
mounting_0001_Old v new.jpg

Inside view of crate. Aluminium sheet sandwiches crate to rack.
In the future a custom RotoPax jerry can mount will be bolted to the aluminium.
mounting_0000_inside.jpg

Lone Rider 6L Mini Bags mounted to crate
Milk_0005_Mini bags.jpg

Naz Bags custom crate cover.
Includes top d-rings and straps for lightweight stuff like a tarp, jackets, sleeping mat etc.
Milk_0004_Naz cover.jpg

Naz Bags custom crate cover with Naz Bags large Molle Utility bags attached.
The Lone Rider bag is actually inside the Utility bag to give you an idea of size.
Milk_0003_Naz bags.jpg
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
At least your welds are better than the gobs of snot on the OEM, but not a patch on the tiny, tidy Tig on the Hitchcock item.
Or the Bronze welding on the Beemers.
Your box cover looks similar to one I fitted to a box I made to carry my little Tenderfield Terrier.
Had a Formply base and 1" by 1/4" flat bar frame , tacked together with a blob of snot, missus ran up the cover on her old Singer treadle.
Both dearly departed, box is still OK!
 

Metalsnacks

Well travelled
Location
Sydney Australia
Great options 👍 Aussie innovation is alive and well. Thanks for sharing mate.
No probs petespace1. It was kinda designed on the fly, so with more use and doing different trips refinement/mods may be necessary. It's all about evolution :)
At least your welds are better than the gobs of snot on the OEM, but not a patch on the tiny, tidy Tig on the Hitchcock item.
Or the Bronze welding on the Beemers.
Your box cover looks similar to one I fitted to a box I made to carry my little Tenderfield Terrier.
Had a Formply base and 1" by 1/4" flat bar frame , tacked together with a blob of snot, missus ran up the cover on her old Singer treadle.
Both dearly departed, box is still OK!
The Himmy is definitely a rudimentary machine. The quality of the RE pannier frames on my bike was atrocious. Nothing was even.
If you're interested to see the initial work on my modified pannier frames and new rear rack its posted in another thread:
https://www.royalenfieldowners.com/index.php?threads/himalayan-panniers-and-set-ups.143/post-13621

If I had the skills I would have fabbed up a complete new rack and pannier system myself using much smaller CrMo tube and TIG welded it. But all I do is farm quality stick welding with general purpose rods. I'd love to learn TIG welding because it annoys me that I can't do intricate little jobs myself. The welding on my rack was done by a work colleague who's a metal fabricator.

Sorry to hear about your missus and terrier.
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
CrMo is cold drawn seamless and thin wall tube which gains a fair bit of its strength from the cold drawing process.
But it looses a fair bit of that strength when heated/ welded, so depending on skill might end up little stronger than a lesser grade.
Norton bought the tube for their frames from Reynolds Tube, cut and bent, and then they welded the lesser grade road bike frames themselves.
But the race bike frames made of the top grade steel were bronze welded for them by Reynolds who had one man they could trust to do it properly!
When I made my side stand adjustable the tube looked like thick wall resistance welded tube, which is universally made from base grade mild steel, think conduit!
Not necessary bad as it is easier to weld than thin wall tube and doesn't loose as much strength when welded , particularly with ag grade stick welds like the RE racks!
Pop was a coded welder and learnt his trade at Rolls Royce and in the RAF and had a smithy and engineering shop which catered for the Iron horse, but he would never teach me to weld.
But he let me braze up the frame when I converted a plunger Triumph Tiger Cub to swinging arm when I was 16. - the rear section from aswing arm frame bent at the front simply slid into the existing cast lugs on the old frame!
He made up bag frames out of what he called boiler pipe , thick walled alloy steel , probably alloyed for strength, corrosion and heat resistance.
He gas welded them together, a lost skill superseded by TIG.
I had my stand welded at my local steel supplier/ fabricator by a coded welder, it is a load bearing structure after all!
Did it no charge but I was a good customer before I retired, and he seemed to like demonstrating his mastery of MIG.
 

Metalsnacks

Well travelled
Location
Sydney Australia
CrMo is cold drawn seamless and thin wall tube which gains a fair bit of its strength from the cold drawing process.
But it looses a fair bit of that strength when heated/ welded, so depending on skill might end up little stronger than a lesser grade.
Racetech Steel in Sydney supply 4130 tube in a wide range of wall thickness Eg. their 11.1mm tube is available in 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 2.1 and 3mm wall thickness. My main attraction to CrMo is for weight saving purposes. I find it hard to shake the philosophy of trying to make things lighter after many years of riding mountain bike endurance events and going on multi-day self sufficient rides. When your body is the engine you become vigilant about lugging around unnecessary weight.
In regard to the Himmy, if I can run a 2kg muffler instead of the factory unit which weighs in excess of 4kg I'll do it. That means I can add some extra lights or another accessory and not add weight to the bike. My philosophy may not align with everyone, but we make our choices based on our own gratification.

It sounds like you have built up a lifetime of motorcycle knowledge. I'm 53 and only became interested in motorcycles 3 years ago.
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
I have scramblerized my Hima and fitted a lighter exhaust system, probably lost around 10 kg, but cant say I noticed or aimed for a weight saving, is was Just a combination of style and stupidity.
4130 is not going to be any lighter unless it is thinner, which is why a thinner grade is usually used if weight saving is important!
With a 3mm wall thickness on a 11.1 mm tube a 10 mm solid bar wouldn't be much heavier, and much easier to work!
 
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