Himalayan 452 ease of maintenance?

JMFLHUSA

Total noob
Will the new Himalayan 452 be as easy to self maintain as the Himalayan 411? The price of routine maintenance has risen dramatically here in North Florida. My local RE dealership did my first maintenance but I've done the next two services because it costs more than $550 for oil filter, valve checks. I doubt the new 452 will be user friendly for routine maintenance, especially valve adjustment. I enjoy my 2022 411 as much as my other bikes, Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports, MOTO GUZZI V85 TT, Honda Rebel 1100 and several Harleys. No, it's not as fast, comfortable as the other bikes but it's a blast to ride the back roads of North Florida and South Georgia.
 
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Andyb

Well travelled
Location
UK
All a bit of a guess until the exact details are known, but the only more complex job will be valve adjustment. Valve checking should be straightforward enough and bucket and shims maintain their settings better than valves opened by rocker arms so actual adjustments may not be needed too often. There is an YT video someplace here where the RE engine designer gives the valve checking interval, I think it was 10,000 km?
If you like your 411 then why not stick with it?
 

REHima

Well travelled
Location
London UK
i saw a video where they said you need to remove the fuel tank to reach the air filter- so based on this its a No from me.

seems they have now designed the bike where you need to go to the dealer as much as possible.
 

JMFLHUSA

Total noob
All a bit of a guess until the exact details are known, but the only more complex job will be valve adjustment. Valve checking should be straightforward enough and bucket and shims maintain their settings better than valves opened by rocker arms so actual adjustments may not be needed too often. There is an YT video someplace here where the RE engine designer gives the valve checking interval, I think it was 10,000 km?
If you like your 411 then why not stick with it?
I'll stay with the 411 at least for 1-2 more years. I have a three year warranty and by then it may not be worth much for trade in so may keep for many years. I agree with Doboy about buying a bike the first year or two in production.
 

Andyb

Well travelled
Location
UK
I also tend to buy bikes once they are proven - back in 1995 I bought one of the very last R80R BMWs and by then the BMW boxer must have had at least 50 years development. But it still leaked petrol onto my boot on day one! Over 85,000 miles it never did that again.

Having to take the tank off to get to the air filter on a 452 is no big deal, simply change the filter when checking valves…..and as it is at the front and high up it may stay dry and clean. Hopefully induction roar will not make the bike too noisy for the rider.
 

Overdrive

Well travelled
Staff member
Location
Southern UK
Having seen and sat on the 452 in the flesh yesterday at the NEC show and I have to say I’m impressed, more than I expected. Build quality looks good, neat welds and wiring routing amongst other things. The underside of it is now flat, with the centre stand well tucked up out of the way and no dangling suspension linkage (it’s on the top of the swing arm). Lovely sitting and standing position (for me at least) with a nice narrow ‘waist’. The only question mark for me is how wide the foot pegs stick out compared with the waisted centre section of the bike - it seemed a bit odd, although no doubt you’d get used to it. Really good shaped seat, and comfortable. The round tft seems smaller than in the photos, and is well positioned.
If it’s priced well and proves reliable they’ll sell loads, and according to someone on the RE stand who was involved in the development they’ve done thousands of hours of real life measured testing which bodes well for its future reliability imo.
 

Spoody

Well travelled
The first valve check interval is at 6000 miles, then 12k, then it's every 12,000 miles after that. I read where someone bemoaned the shim under bucket valve adjustment saying they have taken a 20 minute valve adjustment at home and turned it into a $200 dealer adjustment. Kudos to you if you can do that valve adjustment in 20 minutes I never could. I believe a lot of riders will not put 6,000 or 12,000 miles on their bikes in a year and I'd gladly pay my local dealer to check the adjustment every 12,000 miles instead of me having to do the adjustment every 3,000 miles.
 

Andyb

Well travelled
Location
UK
The first valve check interval is at 6000 miles, then 12k, then it's every 12,000 miles after that. I read where someone bemoaned the shim under bucket valve adjustment saying they have taken a 20 minute valve adjustment at home and turned it into a $200 dealer adjustment. Kudos to you if you can do that valve adjustment in 20 minutes I never could. I believe a lot of riders will not put 6,000 or 12,000 miles on their bikes in a year and I'd gladly pay my local dealer to check the adjustment every 12,000 miles instead of me having to do the adjustment every 3,000 miles.
There is a big difference in the workload between CHECKING bucket and shims and ADJUSTING them. To check them it is simply removing the cylinder head cover and using a feeler gauge. Easy for an owner to do. All the valves will be measured at the same crank position so just one TDC position to find.
Adjusting the gap will mean removing the camshafts to access the buckets in order to replace them to get the right gap. RE may have a clever solution to simplify how to remove the camshafts but this job usually requires opening the cam chain - and then having to rejoin it and check cam / crank alignment. Not too much of a job but not something to do on the roadside as it will take a little time and the correct size of bucket will be needed - so some will prefer a dealer to do this.
This is all very similar to the Triumph 955 triples.
As Spoody has said, valve check intervals are quite long apart - and adjustment may not be needed at each check.
 

nablats

Finally made it
my yam 4 cyl xj650 is bucket and shim, pretty easy, but you have to measure all the clearances, and work out which ones need a new shim, then order them, then fit them. you won`t do that by the side of the road ;)
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
Some bikes you need to remove the buckets to find out the size of the existing shims before you can order new ones.
Most service shops have a selection of shims in common sizes and swap your old shims for new ones the correct size and charge a swap fee , which might save a bit if you do it yourself and have to pay spare part prices for a few shims,
'Probably not as big a deal on a single as a four, but still there!
 

Scott Free

Well travelled
Location
Ill-Annoy
Im hoping for shim over bucket for reasons of ease of maintenance and for logistics simplicity when out in the world.
According to an ADV Pulse page dated 11/1/23 the valves are shim under bucket. Dayum.

This doesn't scare me too much. Back in The Day, I maintained the GF's 1978 KZ650, which had shim-under-bucket valves. They were a bit more work as cam removal was required. However, this was easy enough. If I recall correctly, the engine had an idler that pushed the chain down between the cams; remove this thing and there was enough slack to remove the cams without breaking the chain. Reassembly was easy enough; you aligned marks on the cams with the top of the head, installed the chain tight on the intake cam, counted a magic number of links and set that last link onto a mark on the exhaust cam sprocket. Re-install the idler and torque the cam bearings. Done. Hopefully the Sherpa engine is similarly straightforward.
my yam 4 cyl xj650 is bucket and shim, pretty easy, but you have to measure all the clearances, and work out which ones need a new shim, then order them, then fit them. you won`t do that by the side of the road ;)
Hey, I've also got an old (1980) XJ650. Pretty easy to check, not hard to adjust assuming you have the special tool that holds the bucket down so you can extract the shim. I picked up the bike last year (only 7000 miles but hadn't been run in 20 years; cleaning those carbs was a PITA) and it looks like four of the valves are near their limit. I plan to pull all the shims and write their value down, then see which ones I have to order. Of course, the XJ is a shim-over-bucket engine, so the cams can stay in place. This does make things somewhat easier as long as the $13 special tool works--I used to have a Z1 (shim over bucket, so in theory the cams didn't need to be removed), and the Kawasaki bucket holder tool was such a pain that I ended up just pulling the cams when I needed to change shims.
 

Moistyfeet

Finally made it
Location
Denmark
I guess we just have to get used to that the old way of adjusting valves is over , but hey , just because the interval is about 10.000km then its not sure that they need to be replaced..
i just read on another (india ) forum that they already have replaced one top end on a himalayan , witch i find alarming , but again they do not mention what was wrong, and the same bike had trouble with brakes being noisy ,and the joystick to navigate got stuck , they replaced it all under warranty though, .. i do hear that there is alot of vibration on the bike around the 5000- 6500 rpm , but then again , i have never ridden the bike so what may be alot for the guys in india , could be nothing for me , i had the old Aprilia with the yamaha xt 660 engine on it , and that vibrated alot , but was fun to ride so i didnt care :) , i dont think waiting for 1 or 2 years before buying the himalayan 450 would do anything about vibration , its just the nature of the new himalayan engine.. anyway , i have bought one and it should arrive april in Denmark ..
 

nablats

Finally made it
According to an ADV Pulse page dated 11/1/23 the valves are shim under bucket. Dayum.

This doesn't scare me too much. Back in The Day, I maintained the GF's 1978 KZ650, which had shim-under-bucket valves. They were a bit more work as cam removal was required. However, this was easy enough. If I recall correctly, the engine had an idler that pushed the chain down between the cams; remove this thing and there was enough slack to remove the cams without breaking the chain. Reassembly was easy enough; you aligned marks on the cams with the top of the head, installed the chain tight on the intake cam, counted a magic number of links and set that last link onto a mark on the exhaust cam sprocket. Re-install the idler and torque the cam bearings. Done. Hopefully the Sherpa engine is similarly straightforward.

Hey, I've also got an old (1980) XJ650. Pretty easy to check, not hard to adjust assuming you have the special tool that holds the bucket down so you can extract the shim. I picked up the bike last year (only 7000 miles but hadn't been run in 20 years; cleaning those carbs was a PITA) and it looks like four of the valves are near their limit. I plan to pull all the shims and write their value down, then see which ones I have to order. Of course, the XJ is a shim-over-bucket engine, so the cams can stay in place. This does make things somewhat easier as long as the $13 special tool works--I used to have a Z1 (shim over bucket, so in theory the cams didn't need to be removed), and the Kawasaki bucket holder tool was such a pain that I ended up just pulling the cams when I needed to change shims.
I can recommend the US XJ owners forum - it is quite excellent
 

Eatmore Mudd

Moderator
Staff member
According to an ADV Pulse page dated 11/1/23 the valves are shim under bucket. Dayum.

This doesn't scare me too much. Back in The Day, I maintained the GF's 1978 KZ650, which had shim-under-bucket valves. They were a bit more work as cam removal was required. However, this was easy enough. If I recall correctly, the engine had an idler that pushed the chain down between the cams; remove this thing and there was enough slack to remove the cams without breaking the chain. Reassembly was easy enough; you aligned marks on the cams with the top of the head, installed the chain tight on the intake cam, counted a magic number of links and set that last link onto a mark on the exhaust cam sprocket. Re-install the idler and torque the cam bearings. Done. Hopefully the Sherpa engine is similarly straightforward.

Hey, I've also got an old (1980) XJ650. Pretty easy to check, not hard to adjust assuming you have the special tool that holds the bucket down so you can extract the shim. I picked up the bike last year (only 7000 miles but hadn't been run in 20 years; cleaning those carbs was a PITA) and it looks like four of the valves are near their limit. I plan to pull all the shims and write their value down, then see which ones I have to order. Of course, the XJ is a shim-over-bucket engine, so the cams can stay in place. This does make things somewhat easier as long as the $13 special tool works--I used to have a Z1 (shim over bucket, so in theory the cams didn't need to be removed), and the Kawasaki bucket holder tool was such a pain that I ended up just pulling the cams when I needed to change shims.
I take
According to an ADV Pulse page dated 11/1/23 the valves are shim under bucket. Dayum.

This doesn't scare me too much. Back in The Day, I maintained the GF's 1978 KZ650, which had shim-under-bucket valves. They were a bit more work as cam removal was required. However, this was easy enough. If I recall correctly, the engine had an idler that pushed the chain down between the cams; remove this thing and there was enough slack to remove the cams without breaking the chain. Reassembly was easy enough; you aligned marks on the cams with the top of the head, installed the chain tight on the intake cam, counted a magic number of links and set that last link onto a mark on the exhaust cam sprocket. Re-install the idler and torque the cam bearings. Done. Hopefully the Sherpa engine is similarly straightforward.

Hey, I've also got an old (1980) XJ650. Pretty easy to check, not hard to adjust assuming you have the special tool that holds the bucket down so you can extract the shim. I picked up the bike last year (only 7000 miles but hadn't been run in 20 years; cleaning those carbs was a PITA) and it looks like four of the valves are near their limit. I plan to pull all the shims and write their value down, then see which ones I have to order. Of course, the XJ is a shim-over-bucket engine, so the cams can stay in place. This does make things somewhat easier as long as the $13 special tool works--I used to have a Z1 (shim over bucket, so in theory the cams didn't need to be removed), and the Kawasaki bucket holder tool was such a pain that I ended up just pulling the cams when I needed to change shims.
Dexter Ford, Peter Egan, Robert Pandya, I trust what they say.
All other Moto Journos, not so much.
I'll believe the valves are SOB or SUB when I see the parts in the factory parts book or on video.
 
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