Himalayan lighting

Matt

Well travelled
Location
Australia
I would like to install additional lights (Led) to keep the main lighting to the road and not to the sky when the motorcycle is loaded. I would install the additionnal lights onto the crash bars (Givi type). I am interesting by tuto explaining how easility connect to the lighting network and include a dedicated switch for the extra LED lights.
Second, I would like to replace the original headlight bulb with an LED thus to safe battery. Any recommended type/provider for this LED bulb?

Any advise or feedback for these 2 topics much appreciated and thanks in advance.

DZR
Sory I just posted just this and didn't see this thread. I just installed some led spotlights on the crash bars. I removed the plastic covers on the tank crash bars and bolted them to the holes that hold the covers on. Was super easy, took one hour and they make a huge difference. I can see much further, wider and its much brighter. I can happily see 250m ahead. The photos don't do justice how much brighter it is!
They cost $39 Australia too so pretty cheep.
 

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Napom

Well travelled
Location
Northern VA
Basic wiring is fairly easy. I wired my lights directly to the DRL lead in the headlight, so it comes on whenever the bike is on. I am thinking of moving it to the High Beam as I still get flashed by on coming traffic when I go to low beam at night, but have the spots on. While I am sure there will be some who disagree with the method and don't consider wiring a proper job unless soldered and wrapped, simply stripping some wire off your "Hot" light lead and folding it over the blade of the High Beam connector (or low beam - Dealer's choice) is an easy and effective method that requires no cutting, splicing etc. If installing a switch, I recommend splicing into the DRL lead in the headlight bucket. Positive feeds through the switch to the light. All that's left is finding an appropriate ground . . .
 

Matt

Well travelled
Location
Australia
Looks like a good job 👍. Something I'd like to add is some extra light. Was it an easy install, wiring wise, may I ask?
It was very easy. I wired them into the headlight and to the high beam cable ( mine was yellow with a blue stripe ) I didn't solder but instead crimped and taped.
 

JulianK

Well travelled
Location
Germany
o it comes on whenever the bike is on. I am thinking of moving it to the High Beam as I still get flashed by on coming traffic when I go to low beam at nigh
Holy shit yes! If yours are just half as bright as Matt's LEDs, upcoming traffic will lock directly into the sun at night!

light lead and folding it over the blade of the High Beam connector
Haha! I guess that is one way to do it 😁

There is these clamp things, you place both wires in there they cut thru the insulation and make electrical contact between both copper cores. Its a matter of 5 seconds and is more professional.
T-Tap Electrical Cable Connector Quick Splice Wire Terminals Crimp Connect
 

RotorWrench

Well travelled
Location
USA
Quality battery would be my go to. If not a switch that is always on and only opens when pressed, so you can't accidentally ride with the lights off.
It might be difficult to find a quality delay circuit device that will withstand the rough moto environment.
I have installed in every bike I've owned , especially older legacy bikes (and their inefficient charging systems) a headlight off switch. The older bikes already had a switch. The main reason being that I found years ago that slow single track or trail riding, with a headlight on, was draining my battery down. On older bikes with a switch it was never a problem because I didn't trail tride with a headlight on. That was mainly an issue with big long stroke thumpers and tall gearing. Newer, higher revving (especially twins) don't have that problem because their rpms stay up enough. Where I really notice a difference is slow trail riding in colder temps and I have an electric vest or heated grips. My volt meter tells the tale.

While it was unnecessary with the last three bikes I've had, I still did it because I liked being able to switch the headlight off if the need arises. I still turn them off when trail riding. Personal preference.

That being said, the Himalayan is a slow revving long stroke with fairly spaced gearing as well, so I'll probably do the same for her.
 

JulianK

Well travelled
Location
Germany
@RotorWrench I never had issues drawing to much power from the Himalayan but I have a LED bulb and only USB charger and heated grips.

According to Flicka in the power used to run the bike vs power left over thread there is about 90W left @ 1500rpm and about 150W @ 4000rpm. So the Hima got reserves even at idle to supply phone chargers and heated grips but not a lot more.
If you need more electric power at the trail, I agree with you a switch will be a usefull mod!
I have to do a lot of street riding and consider a headlight a major benefit to my safety. I want to make sure the light is always on.
 

Matt

Well travelled
Location
Australia
I had the multimeter on the battery with my new spotlights on and the bike at idle and the battery voltage held steady so I have no worries about the charging system won't support the need lights.
 

petespace1

Well travelled
Location
NSW Aus
I have installed in every bike I've owned , especially older legacy bikes (and their inefficient charging systems) a headlight off switch. The older bikes already had a switch. The main reason being that I found years ago that slow single track or trail riding, with a headlight on, was draining my battery down. On older bikes with a switch it was never a problem because I didn't trail tride with a headlight on. That was mainly an issue with big long stroke thumpers and tall gearing. Newer, higher revving (especially twins) don't have that problem because their rpms stay up enough. Where I really notice a difference is slow trail riding in colder temps and I have an electric vest or heated grips. My volt meter tells the tale.

While it was unnecessary with the last three bikes I've had, I still did it because I liked being able to switch the headlight off if the need arises. I still turn them off when trail riding. Personal preference.

That being said, the Himalayan is a slow revving long stroke with fairly spaced gearing as well, so I'll probably do the same for her.
Exactly 👍
In most older singles kick start or otherwise including the RE Bullets even up to a few years ago there was the light switch over the start button so you started the bike then switched the light on usually left it on the parking lights, before the DRL became mandatory. So yeah when one of those days when you might have low juice you have the option of switching the headlight off and have just enough to turn the motor over to start the bike.
additionally thinking about when I need the bike power on while I may be trouble shooting the wiring or other lights I don’t want the head light on.
So while extra power when running and better batteries etc. are all good ideas a switch may be the go for me.
 

RotorWrench

Well travelled
Location
USA
Exactly 👍
In most older singles kick start or otherwise including the RE Bullets even up to a few years ago there was the light switch over the start button so you started the bike then switched the light on usually left it on the parking lights, before the DRL became mandatory. So yeah when one of those days when you might have low juice you have the option of switching the headlight off and have just enough to turn the motor over to start the bike.
additionally thinking about when I need the bike power on while I may be trouble shooting the wiring or other lights I don’t want the head light on.
So while extra power when running and better batteries etc. are all good ideas a switch may be the go for me.

There's that, and especially useful when the "authorities" are after you, I can switch my lights off and go to stealth mode :D
 

RotorWrench

Well travelled
Location
USA
@RotorWrench I never had issues drawing to much power from the Himalayan but I have a LED bulb and only USB charger and heated grips.

According to Flicka in the power used to run the bike vs power left over thread there is about 90W left @ 1500rpm and about 150W @ 4000rpm. So the Hima got reserves even at idle to supply phone chargers and heated grips but not a lot more.
If you need more electric power at the trail, I agree with you a switch will be a usefull mod!
I have to do a lot of street riding and consider a headlight a major benefit to my safety. I want to make sure the light is always on.

Good to know I shouldn't have an issue in those conditions with the Himalayan. You'd be surprised under what conditions than can happen. I had a 2001 BMW F650gs Dakar I just sold last year, that with a 400+watt charging system, heated grips and 65watt headlight on, with a MARGINAL battery (was OK but not holding full capacity) after about 30mins of slow (idling along with short throttle blips) on the down slope of a very narrow horse trail, my battery light came on and I noticed I was at 12.5 volts. I kept on going and watching it and noticed a few minutes later it was down to 12. I then realized I had forgotten to turn my headlight off. I did that, stopped and got my r's back up to around 1800 to 2000 for a few minutes and then my voltage came back up. When it hit 13.5volts I took off again with no more issues.

On that bike, available wattage wasn't the issue, it was charging rpm and a marginal battery. I'm bad to take my batteries as long as I can, as long as I'm not experiencing issues. Either way, I like being able to turn my lights off if a particular time comes need arises.

That being said, I have forgotten on a couple of occasions to turn it on when on the road but on that bike I had put a blue LED on my panel that is lit up when the headlight is on, so I caught the error rather quickly when that happened.

And I agree 110% with being seen. I even went so far a few years ago as to put an aircraft white strobe above my headlight and a red strobe above my taillight solely for the purpose of visibility, and it worked well but I was eventually pulled over by the state police and warned to get rid of them, they were illegal on a motorcycle, or be cited and fined next time. The officer was polite about it, and even commented on how far away I was noticed, agreeing with the safety aspect of the strobes, nevertheless, they were still illegal. There you go....
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
@RotorWrench I never had issues drawing to much power from the Himalayan but I have a LED bulb and only USB charger and heated grips.

According to Flicka in the power used to run the bike vs power left over thread there is about 90W left @ 1500rpm and about 150W @ 4000rpm. So the Hima got reserves even at idle to supply phone chargers and heated grips but not a lot more.
If you need more electric power at the trail, I agree with you a switch will be a usefull mod!
I have to do a lot of street riding and consider a headlight a major benefit to my safety. I want to make sure the light is always on.
He did not list the capacity of the R/R which is what determines the rating of the system/ usually blows first, and he did not say if his figures were peak output or continuous rating.
There is also no allowance for loss in the tiny cables or across connections or switches.
Most bikes have a fusible link in the R/R / battery positive lead with a rating around 60% of the peak rating so I would not count on using any more than 180 watts unless you uprate the R/R to a Mosfet rated 450 watts, fit a 20 amp fusible link in the wire from it to the battery and upgrade the battery earth.
Some like to feed any extras from a proper fused and relayed sub board, usually more experienced folk who have seen what overloading the existing system does!
 

JulianK

Well travelled
Location
Germany
@RotorWrench With the headlights on my 1974 CB125 actually discharges the battery at idle rpm.
Before 2000 there wasn't a huge demand for electric power. I assume auxiliary lights were the only electric consumer people put on their bikes and everybody know those were heavy on the electric supply and installed switches. That was long before my riding career started though.

I sometimes see bicycle with a bright strobe headlight - really annoys me!

@Roy Gavin Right, we can only use those numbers as a rough indication of the systems capability and more information/proof about Flickas numbers would be nice. But they are sufficient to find out if low rev riding with additional loads will drain the battery.

The charging and main fuses are 25A. As the fuse always has to be the weakest link we can assume that the whole system is able to handle 25A more or less continuous.
12V * 25A = 300W and 14V * 25A = 350W
350W might be the absolute maximum the RR unit is able to handle. I heard storys of when the Himalayans RR unit has died with less load, so we need to be a bit gentile with it. As usual with semiconductor electronics it can take more load in a could environment and die sooner when operated very hot.
Calculating in a couple of Amps for charging the battery and a safety margin will be necessary!
 

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Yangonnerd

Finally made it
Location
Kalaw, Myanmar
Hello lovely people. Does anyone have any experience in using 100w/90w halogens? (I have an Osram lying around but dont want to stick it in the place of the standard 60/55-ish the 2020 Himalayan has. Do not want to melt/burn/explode/nuclearwaste anything on my new bike :)
Thanks in advance
 
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Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
Maybe find a second hand headlight and replace the original with that. Oh, and a good fuse to avoid losing the smoke.
If that works for some time you might make it a permanent replacement.
 

RotorWrench

Well travelled
Location
USA
Hello lovely people. Does anyone have any experience in using 100w/90w halogens? (I have an Osram lying around but dont want to stick it in the place of the standard 60/55-ish the 2020 Himalayan has. Do not want to melt/burn/explode/nuclearwaste anything on my new bike :)
Thanks in advance
I melted two headlight plugs with those. One on a KLR and the other a BMW Dakar. Most motorcycles and vehicles already are using minimum gauge wire for the current and length of run and rarely have the correct gauge wire harness for 100+ watt bulb draws, resulting in higher resistance, resulting in heat, resulting in melted connectors and/or wires, which actually shouldn't happen if the fuses are matched to the wire gauge, not the load.



Not saying you won't have better luck, just giving past experience. Also, that's a lot of draw if you're running much else, like aux lights, grips and heated clothing.

FWIW, I do prefer the color temp of high output halogens than most LEDs, especially LEDs over 5500k. Off road racers that ride long hours at night prefer lower color temps closer to daylight (around 4800k to 5500k) due to eye strain and reflective glare. That's the reason Baja Designs and Cyclops specialize in lower color temp LEDs for their off-road lights. I switched out the LED high beams on my Jeep to high output halogens (with larger gauge wire harness) and prefer them much more.

Good luck.
 
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