• NEW USERS: If you haven't received your Confirmation Email: There has been an ongoing issue with the forum's send mail function and many new users haven't received the email to confirm their registration. I've done my best to manually process these, so there's a good chance if you've signed up in the past 30 days that you've already been validated and can proceed with posting on the forum (don't forget to introduce yourself!). If you still can't get in, please use the Contact Us link on the bottom of any page to send me a message and I'll process you manually. Thanks for your patience! ~Jerk

Shotgun review by Stuart Fillingham.

CiscoGoodDog

Well travelled
Location
California, USA
This is the second in a series of three reviews
I've been waiting for this. I commented on the first video asking about the handlebar rise and if it felt like you had to reach for the grips. I think he answered it pretty well. I like a little bend in my elbows and I may decide to add risers or swap out the bars. Thanks for posting this video ;-)
 

rcoregon

Finally made it
I've been waiting for this. I commented on the first video asking about the handlebar rise and if it felt like you had to reach for the grips. I think he answered it pretty well. I like a little bend in my elbows and I may decide to add risers or swap out the bars. Thanks for posting this video ;-)
I don’t mind a little bend forward but, like you, I prefer a little bend in my elbows. Interesting comment about the Bonneville seat being painful to ride on for over an hour.
 

rcoregon

Finally made it
Finally got to demo a Shotgun from Sabatino Moto yesterday. My first thought was the bike looks awfully small. I’m use to standing on the peg to swing my leg over on my bikes. Not on the Shotgun. I had no problem mounting the bike standing on the showroom floor. The bike fits my old 6’ frame perfectly. My guess is if you are 5’ 8ish or taller you won’t have a problem with the fit of the bike. The bars seemed about the perfect distance for me but I can see if one had a shorter reach it could be awkward. The kickstand. What a beefy side stand. Easy to use. I was easily impressed and put it up and down a few times. The clutch. I appreciate an easy pull clutch. My 2017 AT had the lightest clutch I’ve ever experienced. The SG’s was fairly light but kind a mushy. Part of the mush could be the adjustment was slightly different than what I was expecting. I could pull it in with two fingers. On to the ride. Anytime one takes off on a new bike there’s a little apprehensive feeling about engaging the clutch. The SG has a piece a cake- slice a pie, smooth as silk transmission. After a few minutes my riding confidence felt like I had spent months on the machine. With a lot of experience riding liter bikes I was concerned the little 650 would be short on power. Wrong! The engine has an amazing amount of torque for such a small motor. My second impression was how incredibly smooth the engine is. For a two cylinder the engine is incredibly smooth. As I was riding down a vacant street my attention was solely focused on the power plant. The vast engineering that has gone into this motor is apparent. The suspension was a little stiff, but the suspended seat helps eliminate a lot of the jolts that you would otherwise feel. I got lost on my demo and was low on fuel and had an iPhone that was almost dead. I stopped a young woman jogging and asked her if she could give me directions back to N. Lombard St. where Sabatino is. Thank you, healthy blonde lady. I thought the bike was diminutive when I first saw it. Recently, I sat on a Indian Scout, which has a much lower seat height than the Shotgun. It’s a short, compact freedom machine. The kind of bike that you can take to the store and do some grocery shopping or, have a fun ride for a couple of hundred miles, perhaps to the Oregon coast. Sabatino Moto is in Portland, Oregon but they will deliver your bike to you at no charge within 100 or so miles of the dealership. My OTD price was less than 8k. It’s no wonder they are the largest Royal Enfield dealer in the Pacific Northwest. I’ll post some pictures as soon as I get my bike. Hopefully next week.
 
Last edited:

2LZ

Well travelled
Location
Volcano, CA
Finally got to demo a Shotgun from Sabatino Moto yesterday. My first thought was the bike looks awfully small. I’m use to standing on the peg to swing my leg over on my bikes. Not on the Shotgun. I had no problem mounting the bike standing on the showroom floor. The bike fits my old 6’ frame perfectly. My guess is if you are 5’ 8ish or taller you won’t have a problem with the fit of the bike. The bars seemed about the perfect distance for me but I can see if one had a shorter reach it could be awkward. The kickstand. What a beefy side stand. Easy to use. I was easily impressed and put it up and down a few times. The clutch. I appreciate an easy pull clutch. My 2017 AT had the lightest clutch I’ve ever experienced. The SG’s was fairly light but kind a mushy. Part of the mush could be the adjustment was slightly different than what I was expecting. I could pull it in with two fingers. On to the ride. Anytime one takes off on a new bike there’s a little apprehensive feeling about engaging the clutch. The SG has a piece a cake- slice a pie, smooth as silk transmission. After a few minutes my riding confidence felt like I had spent months on the machine. With a lot of experience riding liter bikes I was concerned the little 650 would be short on power. Wrong! The engine has an amazing amount of torque for such a small motor. My second impression was how incredibly smooth the engine is. For a two cylinder the engine is incredibly smooth. As I was riding down a vacant street my attention was solely focused on the power plant. The vast engineering that has gone into this motor is apparent. The suspension was a little stiff, but the suspended seat helps eliminate a lot of the jolts that you would otherwise feel. I got lost on my demo and was low on fuel and had an iPhone that was almost dead. I stopped a young woman jogging and asked her if she could give me directions back to N. Lombard St. where Sabatino is. Thank you, healthy blonde lady. I thought the bike was diminutive when I first saw it. Recently, I sat on a Indian Scout, which has a much lower seat height than the Shotgun. It’s a short, compact freedom machine. The kind of bike that you can take to the store and do some grocery shopping or, have a fun ride for a couple of hundred miles, perhaps to the Oregon coast. Sabatino Moto is in Portland, Oregon but they will deliver your bike to you at no charge within 100 or so miles of the dealership. My OTD price was less than 8k. It’s no wonder they are the largest Royal Enfield dealer in the Pacific Northwest. I’ll post some pictures as soon as I get my bike. Hopefully next week.
Great to hear of your positive experience on the new SG650. Can't wait for pics.(y)
 

CiscoGoodDog

Well travelled
Location
California, USA
My first thought was the bike looks awfully small.
My first impression too, and thank goodness. I didn't want to sacrifice the lite, easy handling of my Meteor 350. My Shotgun isn't that big, but it looks bulky compared to the Interceptor and GT. Just over 1k miles now and loving every moment riding ;-)

Shotgun650_01.jpg
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 2LZ

CiscoGoodDog

Well travelled
Location
California, USA
I may decide to add risers or swap out the bars
Nope, it's just right the way it is. The seated position is a little more forward than it is with my Meteor 350, but I have a relaxed bend in my elbows even with the low rise bars. I like the stock setup. The only thing I've changed is adding bar end mirrors.

BarendMirrors_01.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2LZ
Top Bottom