Tire repair

DirtFlier

Total noob
Location
Ohio
I'm seriously considering a Scram 411 and I've owned and ridden many street motorcycles but never one with tube-type tires. I'm curious to know how do you handle a puncture many miles from home?

ps. ....and I have repaired punctures in a tubeless tire while on various trips far from home.
 

dabs

Well travelled
Location
Merseyshire
Well i think many of us wondered the same thing, i'm sure most of the off road boy's are proficient at changing tubes on the fly, but like me if it's been 40+ years since you last changed a tubed tyre then it's trying, i just put a new tyre on the front, no issue, the rear tyre was more challenging, got the tyre on fine then could'nt seat the tyre, redid and pinched the tube twice, a case of practice makes perfect i guess, took it to the shop eventually, if i have a puncture miles from home i'll be calling rescue to either get me to a garage or home.. i may invest in a No pinch tyre tool for the future.
 

Morgan60

Well travelled
Location
NW USA
To start with getting the center stand option for your bike. If it doesn’t come with one. Here is the first YouTube vid that I found. It will explain the tools needed and will help you get started. You don’t have a rim lock so forget about that part.


I take a little dishwashing soap to put on the tire bead and rim, that will help you slip the tire off and on much easier.
 
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Laserman

Well travelled
I've been a user of Slime Tire Sealant for over 30 years on all my tubed tires. Where I grew up, there were goathead thorns everywhere, so I was an expert at patching tubes by the time I was 10 years old. A year later, the original Predator movie came out and my eye caught a bottle of Slime at a hardware store bicycle section because it looked like Predator blood. Reading the bottle, I eagerly tried it out.

Have rarely patched anything since. I have had Slime'd tubes gain dozens of punctures yet go over 20K miles and last for over 10 years on bicycle. My Himalayan is the first motorcycle I have used Slime on - I got a rear puncture 250 miles in and Slime'd the tube after, it went over 6K miles before I replaced it along with the tire. I Slime'd both tubes last month. A 16oz bottle will do both tires, I put 10 in rear and 6 in front.

There are some caveats to using Slime - the main one is to never air your tires with the valve stem in low positions and it doesn't really like patch glue. Some claim to have patched a Slime'd tube, but it generally doesn't patch. It also doesn't do well below freezing. Slime-haters claim it's messy, but it's just liquid latex and cleans up easily with warmish water.
 

Eatmore Mudd

Moderator
Staff member
My advice is get a beater junk donor wheel to practice on. Watch the YouTube for an evening then practice an off/on every day for a week. You'll smile at the time & money saved by doing your own tire changes come replacement time.
The confidence of being able to take care of a flat on the road is well worth the effort of learning it. Pretty satisfying too both in the shed and on the road.
 

dabs

Well travelled
Location
Merseyshire
Laserman i really could'nt decide if Slime was a gimmick or not, recently pinched a tube which has Slime in already, removed it and rotated the tube so Slime oozed out of the pinch hole and left for awhile, pumped the tube up and it lost approx 10% of air, however it looked like the Slime crystalised maybe and has held air for the last 2 weeks, so i'm a convert and will be using it in my tubes, if only it slows a deflation i'll be happy. Dont think a patch would stick somehow though and would rather replace the tube.

The wheel well on the rear at least seems quite shallow so the tube appears to be closer to the rim, anyway practice makes perfect they say.
 

Morgan60

Well travelled
Location
NW USA
I also use Slime in my motorcycle tubes. Never in my bicycle tubes. The bicycle is so super easy to change out the tubes. The Slime over time does get old after a while and will no longer work as it should so one need to keep that in mind.

For tubeless tires I use Ride-On: Tire Sealant & Balancer. Manly for the balance benefit in my HD Road Glide, it’s my long distance touring bike. It really works great. It however the sealant part doesn’t work well in tubes.

 

DirtFlier

Total noob
Location
Ohio
I've been using Ride-On for years now and as I recall, the original magazine eval of that product was on a dual-sport bike with tube types. That was back in the 80s so a lot has happened since then.

For a while Ride-On was completely off the market as the US Military was buying all production and this was during one of our desert wars but it eventually came back. Originally it was never touted for its balancing capability but it does that although I still use metal stick-on weights after fitting a new tire. I have a tire balancer and do my own tire changes so it's a no-brainer.
 
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