What have you done to your Himalayan today (or yesterday, or this week ...)

sendcleanpants

Getting there...
Location
Greenport, NY
Did my own 300 mile first service after dealership said they'd need me to drop the bike off for 4-6 weeks (no appointments, first come....)

I'm not a mechanic at all (not including my skills as a farkle-installer) but am pleased with learning the process and feel even better about the bike. Took me longer than I'd hoped as I set the valves at the wrong TDC and had to open it all up again to get to right- I think I'd be really fast now!

Also fitted a set of OEM pannier racks and am trying different bags to see what fits how I want. These are the $pendy Mosko Moto Backcountry 35. Really well built but too much $, and I feel, too tall. (Exactly, however, what I'd keep for a long trip, and just seems like overkill for the day-to-day commuting, and grocery-getting! Today I fitted a set of Tusk Pilots, but I dislike the over-the-seat straps and all the fiddly webbing to secure the bags to the bike. Back to the drawing board!


5617
 

Pirate

Well travelled
Location
Aldershot, UK
Yes, well done on the service - good job. It's really only the valve clearances that stop me from dipping my toe in the water of self-servicing. I'm sure I could manage the oil change etc but the thought of messing up the valves makes me shy away from that one.
 

petespace1

Well travelled
Location
NSW Aus
Did my own 300 mile first service after dealership said they'd need me to drop the bike off for 4-6 weeks (no appointments, first come....)

I'm not a mechanic at all (not including my skills as a farkle-installer) but am pleased with learning the process and feel even better about the bike. Took me longer than I'd hoped as I set the valves at the wrong TDC and had to open it all up again to get to right- I think I'd be really fast now!

Also fitted a set of OEM pannier racks and am trying different bags to see what fits how I want. These are the $pendy Mosko Moto Backcountry 35. Really well built but too much $, and I feel, too tall. (Exactly, however, what I'd keep for a long trip, and just seems like overkill for the day-to-day commuting, and grocery-getting! Today I fitted a set of Tusk Pilots, but I dislike the over-the-seat straps and all the fiddly webbing to secure the bags to the bike. Back to the drawing board!
Most mosko moto gear is great.
The backcountries are brilliant, even the backcountry duffle and the Nomax tank bag. That would be a great set. I need to save up 🧐🤔
 

sendcleanpants

Getting there...
Location
Greenport, NY
Yes, well done on the service - good job. It's really only the valve clearances that stop me from dipping my toe in the water of self-servicing. I'm sure I could manage the oil change etc but the thought of messing up the valves makes me shy away from that one.
The oil change is a breeze. I'll never pay for that again. I was honestly terrified about opening up the valve covers, removing the tank, etc. Did them wrong, did it again. Faster. I know that I can adjust them properly now and hear and feel a difference from wrong vs right.

I was for sure inclined to have this dealer-serviced always. Now... I'd like to ride to some of the great dealers I've seen in the forums and spend my money with them. Meantime I'll keep my new wrenches.
 

RotorWrench

Finally made it
Location
USA
Did my own 300 mile first service after dealership said they'd need me to drop the bike off for 4-6 weeks (no appointments, first come....)

I'm not a mechanic at all (not including my skills as a farkle-installer) but am pleased with learning the process and feel even better about the bike. Took me longer than I'd hoped as I set the valves at the wrong TDC and had to open it all up again to get to right- I think I'd be really fast now!

Also fitted a set of OEM pannier racks and am trying different bags to see what fits how I want. These are the $pendy Mosko Moto Backcountry 35. Really well built but too much $, and I feel, too tall. (Exactly, however, what I'd keep for a long trip, and just seems like overkill for the day-to-day commuting, and grocery-getting! Today I fitted a set of Tusk Pilots, but I dislike the over-the-seat straps and all the fiddly webbing to secure the bags to the bike. Back to the drawing board!


View attachment 5617
The Moskos are definitely some of the best built, if not THE best built bags out there but as far as pannier size goes, they really aren't taller than average hard panniers. The problem is you have to mount them a little higher than a hard pannier because of the exhaust. I need the capacity of the Moskos and my hard panniers because I commute daily on my bike and carry my rain gear, tools, my EDC bag which has survival, first aid and personal protection gear, as well as my lunch and riding clothing.

The Tusks actually mount well to the racks and don't require the over-the-seat straps. They are a great value as well. I'd give them a second chance if the size works for you.

For security, like being in town and leaving your bike in parking lots or frequently unattended, hard panniers are hard to beat for the obvious security reasons and being lockable. That's when I use my hard panniers. Those in the photo are original Happy Trails that I bought new in 2000 and have over 200,000 miles on them. 20220613_212851.jpg
 
Last edited:

Yangonnerd

Getting there...
Location
Kalaw, Myanmar
Catching up: View attachment 5619View attachment 5620View attachment 5621

Catching up. Fitted a couple of homemade (100mm) tool tubes to the Himalayan a week or so go. Did a pre-outback tour overnight shakedown yesterday and today. I think the right-hand tool tube was um badly positioned/too long. Whoops.

Didn't lose anything thankfully, well besides the cap.
That is a VERY awesome idea :eek:. Thanks for giving inspiration. Won't buy the expensive panniers, but made my wife happy today with a (I told her very explicitly!) Temporary pannier "basket" :D but will use you guys' nice ideas to make some DiY panniers that are a little more waterproof for rainy season :DIMG_20220630_131903.jpg
 

RotorWrench

Finally made it
Location
USA
That is a VERY awesome idea :eek:. Thanks for giving inspiration. Won't buy the expensive panniers, but made my wife happy today with a (I told her very explicitly!) Temporary pannier "basket" :D but will use you guys' nice ideas to make some DiY panniers that are a little more waterproof for rainy season :DView attachment 5633

Looks serviceable to me. In the end all that matters is using what works for your needs, regardless of "style" or looks.
 

dabs

Well travelled
Location
Merseyshire
New chain fitted today, VX3 :giggle: probably a little overkill for the Himmy but as the chain was gifted to me by an Engineer friend with lots of RE experience who was adamant that i replace the OEM chain i felt it would be just rude not to change it..
Used an Afam riveter for the hollow links, 1st for me as usually i buy endless chains and service the swing arm at the same time.

Not sure about the RE owners manual in relation to setting slack on the chain, seems a little odd to me how it's described, i have pushed the chain up towards the bottom of the swing arm for a measure and detracted that from the measurement to the chain pulled down which is approx 27mm and on the centre stand with the chain hanging free equates to approx 50mm slack, with the bike on the wheels and me sat on, the wife measured the chain slack at 30mm, cant help but feel for an Adventure bike this is a little tight !? but i'll see how it feels when out. For anybody doing this or adjusting your chain for the 1st time the 1st bolt (from the left) on the chain guard is just about centre of the chain run.
VX3HollowpinAfam.jpgVX3Chain.jpg
 

Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
Had the OEM Pirelli front tire replaced by a Heidenau K60; odo reads 19500 km. The OEM had still a bit of meat left but I plan to take a longer ride so I thought I'd rather be safe.
Still on the OEM chain....
 

Laserman

Well travelled
With all the oil talk lately and that ominously dark wink in the inspection window, I decided to do an oil change today. 100+F is common here in California's central valley, and I recently finished up a week of hot weather testing with full front bags (thread about that coming soon) at speeds of up to 70MPH! No wonder that oil was black, all the dinos were burned.

"Toto" is at 5500 miles and I figured it's a good time to upgrade to full synthetic. I had a magnetic drain plug from Hitchcock's and RE oil filter in hand, so I grabbed 2 quarts of Lucas 20w50 full synthetic from a local shop. While I have done hundreds of oil changes in my life, this was the first time I have done it on this bike, so I watched a few videos on YT about it. This one is my favorite, and I basically copied it down to the cardboard "funnels" lol. I disabled the ignition to crank engine over a few times to cough up the rest of the muck in the external oil lines rather than run the engine for 10 seconds without oil.

The whole oil change took about a 1.5 quarts and a half hour. Ran the engine for a few mins, no leaks, so I geared up and went for a 25 mile ride. I noticed slightly cooler running, shifting into 5th improved in feel, and clutch engagement lost the initial "grabbiness" it had. Also, my onboard compass now points 180 degrees off, wonder if the new drainplug did that? :ROFLMAO:
 

Overdrive

Finally made it
Location
Southern UK
Re: Fully synthetic oil.
You may find that the clutch slips unless the (Lucas?) oil you used was to Jaso MA2 spec, which is what Enfield and most other manufacturers specify.
MA2 oil contains friction modifiers specifically to deal with the wet multi plate clutch found in most motorcycles, whereas normal car oil does not. In addition the oil has to deal with the shearing forces in the gearbox, which a car oil does not.
Personally I use a Jaso spec semi synthetic motorcycle oil and simply change it out every couple of thousand miles to allow for the fact a semi breaks down more quickly than a full synthetic, and the oil in these little air cooled bikes has a hard time.
I hope yours is ok.
 
Top Bottom