Would you buy again?

grymsr

Well travelled
Location
Maine
Yes, but...
If I bought a third, the missus would probably brain me with a skillet.
2019 - piddling little things = stalling (before Boosterplug), tendency to flop on side stand, hard seat, etc. etc.
2020 - stone reliable. - first ride was from west Massachusetts to Maine in torrential downpour. not a single problem yet.
 

sendcleanpants

Getting there...
Location
Greenport, NY
Absolutely. I was honestly hoping my wife would start riding and I'd go buy a second one. Have a '22 and have enjoyed rigging it how I want it and look forward to some trips. Summertime is non-stop work for me, so I've been getting it sorted for a fall trip. First vehicle I've felt comfortable working on- did the first service/ valve adjustment myself. Only pang is really that my local dealer support is lousy, especially compared to some of the incredible dealers who participate here and on the FB groups. And gear- I would happily rep the brand if there were more shirts etc. Great brand, with dynamic brand loyalty. Love the bike and the community.
 

BruceH

Getting there...
Location
MA/NH
Bought it new in March but didn't take it out until April (snow/salt on roads). 3400 miles into it at this point (4months later). Honestly I kept looking for an excuse to go back to the Harleys but this bike just satisfies. It's so easy to handle at low speeds, confidence inspiring at every stop, not like my 800 and 900 pound baggers used to be at all. Come to a stop and take off easily, no worries. Just easy peasy to ride. Haven't actually taken it off road yet, maybe I wont't, don't know. Loving the back roads and 45 mph cruising. Now thinking about a little 5/6 day ride just to break things in a little more. Would buy another one in a second if this one ceased to exist for some reason. Would be a pain in the backside to replace the farkles but would go ahead and do it. Yeah, it gets in your blood somehow. Just a great, simple, diy motorcycle.
 

Laserman

Well travelled
Took my Gold Wing out and dusted off the cobwebs. Riding an 850 pound bike instead of the light 400 ish pounds of the Himalayan took a few Kms to get used to. The Himalayan is a nice treat after riding a heavier bike.
Yeah, up until '08 I had an $1800 GL1100 that I put over 200K miles on, it was a tank, especially when it was full of stuff and an old lady lol. I don't miss it's weight, the Himalayan is a dance partner compared to a 'Wing. Nothing eats up the highway miles like a GL1x00, but that whale will get beached on roads a Himmie eats for breakfast :D
 

VStarRider

Well travelled
Would I buy another Himalayan?

No.

Let me explain.

I bought my '21 almost a year ago, it was 2200 miles on it. I have had some issues with it; it remains at the dealership right now with an undiagnosed pre-detonation problem.

However, this is not the reason I would not buy another. I bought a Classic 350 about 6 weeks ago, and I absolutely love it. Royal Enfield quality is skyrocketing, and the Classic is a brand new model and it is far more refined and built more solidly than the older Himalayan platform ... of course, this is my subjective opinion. The Classic meets my needs for the local rides and commuting that comprise 60% of the miles I ride annually.

Like @johnny42 , I have no use for spoked wheels. I had my first flat tire on a motorcycle this year, and it was on the Himalayan. What a pain to deal with a tube, and I will never have a bike with spoked, tubed wheels again.

So, using 20/20 hindsight, I would have the Classic 350, and an Africa Twin DCT. The Africa Twin would replace the Himalayan and Gold Wing as my light off-roading and touring bike. The Africa Twin has all the features I want and is 400 lbs light than the GW. I am done with heavy bikes, but that is for another thread. I also feel more comfortable going long distance on a bike with an established, extensive dealer network.
 

Matt

Well travelled
Location
Australia
That's the great thing about choices and options. I drove 12hrs round trip to get a '21 model because the closest dealer (3hrs) only had '22 models and I prefer the '21s.
Wish I had done the same. I have a 22 model but I hate the damn tripper. The screen is too bright. The clock on it runs ridiculously fast ( within a month or two not connected to Bluetooth and its 15 minutes fast ) and I used it once and didn't like it.
 

XRN

Getting there...
Location
Oxford. UK
Yes! Most certainly. I bought it as a mid range to explore and occasional commute. And everyone I talk to about it, my first comment is 'its a fun bike'. It really is. It is a get you there bike', not a going there. Comfortable, steady and fun.
Plenty of grunt on the roads, but unsure of motorways, as this is where it lacks the power. But it is easy to stay off them and even venture everywhere you want.... Within sensible reason.
 

Bluestrom13

Well travelled
Location
UK
I occasionally ride motorways - usually no more than 20 - 25 miles. The bike, now at 8000+ miles sits at a steady 65 - 70mph without apparent stress.
Before I built up a little confidence in the bike, I would sit at 60 mph.
HGVs travel at that speed, so you're not causing a problem for anyone. And that's what the LH lane is for.(Slower traffic).

(YMMV if in USA.)
 

XRN

Getting there...
Location
Oxford. UK
Yes. I would venture on the motorways more, but I don't like not having the 'get out of trouble power' my old 750 twin had.
But staying on the main roads lets me find more of the local area, the motorways hide.
I used to have a Yam XTZ750 Super Tenererre which had the 'oomph' to get out of trouble, and used to ride the 350mile trip to 'home'.
 

Burcotbiker

Getting there...
Location
UK Midlands
Hello all. I have joined the forum this morning as I have just purchased my second Himalayan. I had a new one back in 2019 and sold it after a year to make room for a project but instantly regretted it. I have just got a 2021 new version which was 10 months old and had 800 miles on the clock but it's already up to nearly 2000 😀 I paid £3850 and feel that what you get for your money with a Himalayan is unrivalled. As someone pointed out, what I had paid for basically a new bike is probably less than a full set of factory luggage on a GS 😂 I have also got a customised Bonneville scrambler which I love but it's hardly been out the garage since the Himmy turned up despite it being the best summer we have had for years in the UK 👍
 

Pirate

Well travelled
Location
Aldershot, UK
In the same circumstances that I bought mine (new rider, first proper bike) I'd definitely buy again. My Himalayan has proved to be thoroughly reliable and enjoyable during the 9000 miles I have put on it - fun, forgiving, cheap as chips to run. I do, however, do a few longer trips to France and that is why I'm thinking of upgrading to a Tiger 850 Sport - similar size and weight but plenty more power for easier motorway riding.
 

RotorWrench

Well travelled
Location
USA
The 850 Sports are good looking bikes. If you haven't ridden one be sure and try one out first if weight is an issue fore you. Some owners on another forum said the claimed weight was around 475lbs (Himalayan around 430) but it sure felt heavier than that and had issues on trails and picking it up.

On asphalt they loved it.

Good luck!
 
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Overdrive

Well travelled
Location
Southern UK
Although I’m not
In the same circumstances that I bought mine (new rider, first proper bike) I'd definitely buy again. My Himalayan has proved to be thoroughly reliable and enjoyable during the 9000 miles I have put on it - fun, forgiving, cheap as chips to run. I do, however, do a few longer trips to France and that is why I'm thinking of upgrading to a Tiger 850 Sport - similar size and weight but plenty more power for easier motorway riding.
Although I’m not a new rider (45 years of big, mainly, sports bikes) I bought my Himalayan to do local exploring and a bit of off road, which it has been brilliant at, however, like you I guess, as I travel further afield I’m finding it’s limitations - it’s hard work to do big miles on, and not ideal for bigger roads. Great when I get to where I’m going, but just takes forever to get there!
Just my take on things, but the tiger may weigh the same as a Himalayan, but feels very top heavy in comparison. I’m seriously considering a ‘22 Honda 500 X to run alongside the Himalayan. Cheap to buy and run, capable on bigger roads, the latest version appears to have the issues people have moaned about over the years sorted out (except the cast wheels) and there’s loads of sensibly priced luggage/protection available as it’s been around so long and just refined over the years. Maybe worth a thought?
 

Pirate

Well travelled
Location
Aldershot, UK
Thanks Overdrive. Looking at the 500X I'm not sure it'll take top box, panniers plus pillion which is a necessity for me. This is another reason I love the Himalayan, it does all of this and more!
 

JurS

Finally made it
Location
Swindon
If you had asked me before last week I'd have said yes, sure. The bike is less than a year old and I have done nearly 6000 miles on it, including a couple of overseas trips.

But then it began developing intermittent starting issues, with the engine refusing to start up even though it was cranking over. One day it would start, the next day it wouldn't unless I waited for a while and tried again. On Tuesday I took it to the dealer but I never got there because it stalled and cut out en route. Fortunately I could safely pull over and park the bike. I had to organise emergency recovery (fortunately included in the warranty) which took 3 hours to arrive. The dealer then took the bike in on suspicion of a failed relay. A known issue, apparently, and he had even an old relay lying on his counter to show to customers!

What the.... - if this is a known issue why don't RE issue a recall for bikes that might be affected? What if it had stalled on a busy intersection, or when overtaking? What if I'd been greenlaning on a byway where the recovery vehicle can't even get to it?

He has had the bike for 2 days now and I still haven't heard anything.

Maybe I should go back to a Yamaha or a Honda. I never had anything like it on those bikes I've owned.
 

RotorWrench

Well travelled
Location
USA
If you had asked me before last week I'd have said yes, sure. The bike is less than a year old and I have done nearly 6000 miles on it, including a couple of overseas trips.

But then it began developing intermittent starting issues, with the engine refusing to start up even though it was cranking over. One day it would start, the next day it wouldn't unless I waited for a while and tried again. On Tuesday I took it to the dealer but I never got there because it stalled and cut out en route. Fortunately I could safely pull over and park the bike. I had to organise emergency recovery (fortunately included in the warranty) which took 3 hours to arrive. The dealer then took the bike in on suspicion of a failed relay. A known issue, apparently, and he had even an old relay lying on his counter to show to customers!

What the.... - if this is a known issue why don't RE issue a recall for bikes that might be affected? What if it had stalled on a busy intersection, or when overtaking? What if I'd been greenlaning on a byway where the recovery vehicle can't even get to it?

He has had the bike for 2 days now and I still haven't heard anything.

Maybe I should go back to a Yamaha or a Honda. I never had anything like it on those bikes I've owned.
I can appreciate your frustration and granted there have been issues with the bike , relays being one of them, if that indeed is the problem, but owning, riding and wrenching on several makes of motorcycles over the last few decades, I can tell you none are immune to problems, especially fleet wide and manufacturer known issues.

If you will quickly browse through some Yamaha, Honda, BMW Kawasaki, KTM etc.... forums you will quickly find numerous complaints of recurring problems that the manufacturers are or should be supposedly "aware of" and dragging their feet on resolving or even acknowledging. It is a common theme to most all manufacturers of all products.

None are perfect and while my prior statements are fact, Royal Enfield is one company that does have a recent history of, and even acknowledged by some motorcycle e-zine writers and reviewers, making sincere efforts of hearing and listening to their customers and trying to resolve problems.

Unethical, unknowledgeable and/or poor customer service from some dealers has been a contributing factor as well.

I hope your experience hasn't soured you too much on an otherwise enjoyable bike to own, as evidenced by this very thread.
 

JurS

Finally made it
Location
Swindon
Thanks Rotorwrench. I just picked up my bike, they have replaced the fuel pump relay under warranty but haven't replaced the other ones. I got a story about there having been a bad batch and the fuel pump relay was one of those but the others aren't. I'm not sure I believe all that (how can they tell?) so I ordered a set of Hella replacement relays from Amazon (thanks to info I found on this site) and will replace the other 4 as well myself.

I'm going to write to RE UK about this and tell them that they really ought to issue a recall for this. A bike stalling at random moments is just an accident waiting to happen. It is a known issue, my dealer even has an old relay on the counterto show to the customers! can't believe they let that slide instead of at the very least check all relays during a service and replace the ones suspected to be 'from the bad batch'.

I'm planning a trip of a couple of hundred miles this weekend and just hope that I'm not going to find myself stranded at the roadside again. To be fair, this is the first time the bike failed on me in almost 6000 miles, but it does dent your confidence.
 

RotorWrench

Well travelled
Location
USA
Thanks Rotorwrench. I just picked up my bike, they have replaced the fuel pump relay under warranty but haven't replaced the other ones. I got a story about there having been a bad batch and the fuel pump relay was one of those but the others aren't. I'm not sure I believe all that (how can they tell?) so I ordered a set of Hella replacement relays from Amazon (thanks to info I found on this site) and will replace the other 4 as well myself.

I'm going to write to RE UK about this and tell them that they really ought to issue a recall for this. A bike stalling at random moments is just an accident waiting to happen. It is a known issue, my dealer even has an old relay on the counterto show to the customers! can't believe they let that slide instead of at the very least check all relays during a service and replace the ones suspected to be 'from the bad batch'.

I'm planning a trip of a couple of hundred miles this weekend and just hope that I'm not going to find myself stranded at the roadside again. To be fair, this is the first time the bike failed on me in almost 6000 miles, but it does dent your confidence.

I agree. After reading several reports of relay issues, many actual just loose connections rather than failures, I ordered and replaced my relays as well. My exploring and camping takes me to some pretty remote locations and I'm not too keen on being stranded 40 or 50 miles from the nearest phone or cell signal.

In a pinch remember you can usually jump most relays, at least to get you home. I hope your trip is good.
 

JurS

Finally made it
Location
Swindon
I agree. After reading several reports of relay issues, many actual just loose connections rather than failures, I ordered and replaced my relays as well. My exploring and camping takes me to some pretty remote locations and I'm not too keen on being stranded 40 or 50 miles from the nearest phone or cell signal.

In a pinch remember you can usually jump most relays, at least to get you home. I hope your trip is good.
What do you mean by 'jump a relay'?
 
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